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Mark Foote

Post title:  Discrete as Opposed to Infinite Reality

(Jul 10 2013 at 12:04 PM)

 

 

The enlightenment of Gautama, later called "the Buddha", concerned the nature of suffering- is it not so?

What is relevant to the experience of suffering is that the continuity of consciousness and the consequent impression of self are illusory, that in fact consciousness exists only in connection with sense organ and sense object, and that close attendance on sense organ, sense object, consciousness, impact, and feeling can bring about conditions conducive to the cessation of ignorance and thereby suffering.

Oh, and the movement of breath is intimately connected with the continuity of consciousness, so much so that Bodhidharma advised Huike "inwardly have no coughing or sighing in the mind".

I can aim for a the continuity of mind that has no coughing or sighing, yet I will suffer without the realization that continuity is a state induced through attendance on what I really am, the pieces and parts that enter into my existence.

Bodhidharma said, "the seal of truth of the Buddhas is not gotten from another". Lineage holders reinforcing notions contrary to the statement of fact from Bodhidharma seem to be everywhere in "Buddhism"; in doing so, they generally avoid talking about discrete as opposed to infinite reality.



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